{{Blanks}} & [[Spaces]]

{{Blanks}} & [[Spaces]]

(A hack of John Harper’s Lasers & Feelings)

I am a big fan of John’s little two-page game Lasers & Feelings. I think it is especially good for hacking to fit with different adventure game styles and settings. So I’ve created this fill-in-the-blank version to encourage other people to create their own versions. This game, {{Blanks}} & [[Spaces]], like the original Lasers & Feelings is released under a CC BY-NC-SA license.

You are _________. Your mission is to explore _________, deal with _________, and defend _________ against _________. Your boss _________ has been overcome by _________, leaving you to fend for yourselves while your boss _________.

 

Players: Create Characters

  1. Choose a style for your character: _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, or _________.
  2. Choose a role for your character: _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, or _________.
  3. Choose your number, from 2 to 5. A high number means you are better at {{_________}} (described here _________.) A low number means you’re better at [[_________]] (described here _________.)
  4. Give your character a cool _________ adventure name. Like _________ or something.

Clothing and Equipment: _________, _________, _________, or _________.

Player goal: Get your character involved in crazy _________  genre adventures and try to make the best of them.

Character goal: Choose one or create your own: _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, or _________.

 

Players: Create the _________ Location

As a group, pick Two Strengths for _________ Location: _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, _________, or _________.

Also, pick One Problem: _________ (described here _________,) _________ (described here _________,) _________ (described here _________,) or _________ (described here _________.)

 

Rolling the Dice

When you do something risky, roll 1d6 to find out how it goes. Roll +1d if you’re prepared and +1d if you’re an expert. (The GM tells you how many dice to rol, based on your character and the situation.) Roll your dice and compare each die result to your number.

If you’re using {{_________}}  (described here __________,) you want to roll under your number

If you’re using [[_________]]  (described here __________,) you want to roll over your number.

0 If none of your dice succeed, it goes wrong. The GM says how things get worse somehow.

1 If one die succeeds, it you barely manage it. The GM inflicts a complication, harm, or cost.

2 If two dice succeed, you do it well. Good job!

3 If three dice succeed, you get a critical success! The GM tells you some extra effect you get.

! If you roll your number exactly, you have {{Blank}} [[Spaces]]! You get a special insight into what’s going on. Ask the GM a question and they’ll answer you honestly. Some good questions:

What are they really feeling? Who’s behind this? How could I get them to do what I want? What should I be on the lookout for? What’s the best way to do this thing? What’s really going on here?

You can change your action if you want to, then roll again.

Helping: If you want to help someone else who’s rolling, say how you try to help and make a roll. If you succeed, give them +1d.

 

GM: Create a _________ Adventure

Roll or choose on the tables below.

A Threat

1. 4.
2. 5.
3. 6.

Wants to

1. 4.
2. 5.
3. 6.

The

1. 4.
2. 5.
3. 6.

Which will

1. 4.
2. 5.
3. 6.

 

GM: Run the Game

Play to find out how they defeat the threat. Introduce the threat by showing evidence of its recent badness. Before a threat does something to the characters, show signs that it’s about to happen, then ask what they do.

Call for a roll when the situation is uncertain. Don’t pre-plan outcomes. Let the chips fall where they may. Use failures to push the action forward. The situation always changes after a roll, for good or ill.

Ask questions and build on the answers.

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