7 Ways to Reuse Abandoned Games

7 Ways to Reuse Abandoned Games

What do you do with abandoned tabletop games? Think of card, board, or roleplaying games that you own that you no longer play. Maybe the rules don’t interest you anymore. Maybe they interest you, but you no longer have someone to play with. They are missing pieces. They are too expensive. For whatever reason, you have abandoned the games you used to play. But is there a way you can still use them?
Let’s talk about a few ways to repurpose those games so that you can still get some use out of them, or at least have fun with their components. Now, I don’t know what kinds of games you have lying around, so I’ve decided to phrase these ideas as questions. We’re relying on your creativity to figure out how they apply to your specific situation.

1. Physical Components: Can you use the art, cards or board pieces in another game? Maybe the art would make a good inspiration for another rpg. The board pieces could be replacements for another game.

2. Rules Hack: Can you change the rules to skip the part of the game that doesn’t work for  you? There’s no game police telling you that you have to play a whole game of Monopoly. You can skip to the end, if you like.

3. Spiritual Sequel: Can you write your own game that uses this game as inspiration? Our hobby has a long tradition of fantasy heartbreakers, that are essentially someone’s attempt to use D&D as inspiration for a new game. Though not all of these are great, some of them are. Can you make a “heartbreaker” based off of a card or board game you abandoned?

4. Swap: Can you trade this game away to one of your friends for another game? This may feel like cheating. You aren’t hacking the game. You are literally reusing it by giving it to someone who wants to play it. In return, they probably have a game that you’ve never tried that they are willing to give you.

5. Update: Are there alternate rules for this game available on the Internet? Playing with revised or updated rules may help renew your passion for the game. Are there errata that have been breaking the game? Nerfing those can make a world of difference.

6. Doing It Wrong: The French poet Paul Valery wrote “That which has always been accepted by everyone, everywhere, is almost certain to be false.” What can you do to break this game, to use it incorrectly, or to play it backwards? How can you make a new game by using the old game wrong?

7. Steps: What section of the original gameplay was the most fun? What did you love to do in the game? How can you borrow just that part of the gameplay and do it in a different game?

Here are seven ways to squeeze a little more fun out of tabletop games you’ve abandoned. But I’m sure there are more methods. What other ways can you think of to reuse, repurpose, or recycle tabletop games that you used to love? Send your tips or examples to gingergoatpress@gmail.com

(This post originally appeared on my Ginger Goat blog April 2016.)

Run! Fire!

Run! Fire!

Here is a free, 3-player card game about a wildfire in ranch country.

Run! Fire!

A card game for 3 players. 15-20 minutes.
In this game, you play three ranchers trying to escape a huge grass fire. Will you help put the fire out? Will you panic and run? Who will survive?

Setup

3 players
Deal each player 3 each of Fire and Run. (Use red cards for Fire and black cards for Run)
Make a central deck of 2 Fire and 2 Run
Each player starts with 10 coins

Play

Every player plays one card of their choice face down into a pile in the center. The tallest player is dealer this round. The dealer draws one card from the central deck, shows it to all the players, and puts it face down in the pile. Each player then bets.

To bet, play a card from your hand face up in front of you. Put at least one coin on that card. (If you play a face up Fire card, you are trying to fight the fire. The more coins you place on it, the more committed you are to extinguishing the fire. If you place a face up Run card, you are trying to save yourself by escaping the fire. Betting represents your decision whether to help extinguish the fire or run and try to save yourself.)

After each player bets, the dealer shuffles the pile of face down cards. He plays one card in the middle of the table face up. He then places the rest of the cards on the top of the central deck. If this card matches the face up card a player has bet, that player is a winner this round. Everyone else loses. The winners split all the coins that have been bet. If the coins cannot be split evenly, give the extras to the dealer, even if the dealer lost this round. Place the face up card that you bet with back in your hand.

The player to the tallest player’s left is the new dealer. Players play another card of their choice face down in the middle of the table. The dealer takes one card from the top of the central deck, shows it face up to all the players, then shuffles it facedown into the facedown pile. Then everyone bets. (If you have coins left, you must bet at least one during each round.) Then the dealer plays one card from the facedown pile face up. Players who match that card with their bet card win. Split the coins among the winners, then place the card you bet with back in your hand.

The position of dealer then rotates one more time, so each player has had the chance to deal once. Play another round just like before.

Scoring

Now, each player shows their remaining cards face up, and everyone calculates their score. Any player with more than 10 points lives. That means you escape the fire and win the game.

Run!

Look at all the players’ cards. If more than half are Run cards, the ranchers were not able to work together and put out the fire. (Those who lived are the folks who ran away. Those who died are those who tried to extinguish the fire.) Run cards are worth 2 points. Fire cards are worth 0 points. Coins are worth 1 point.

Fire!

Look at all the players’ cards. If more than half are Fire cards, the ranchers were able to put out the fire. (Those who lived worked together bravely to extinguish the fire. Those who died were the ranchers who panicked, made a wrong turn, and got caught by the fire.) Run cards are worth 0 point. Fire Cards are worth 2 points. Coins are worth 1 point.

(This game was originally posted on the Ginger Goat blog in April 2016.)

Blatant Bribery! Free Sourcebook!

I’m an English teacher. It makes perfect sense that I’m starting a poetry podcast. And it makes perfect sense for me to support that podcast with a Patreon.

But Patreons grow slowly, and I want to give this one a little boost. And more of you know me as a game designer than as a poet. So it’s time for some blatant bribery! If you sign up as a patron of Versed, my new biweekly, 5-minute poetry podcast, I will give you a copy of a rare, not-available-for-sale rpg sourcebook called Dangers Elsewhere.

Dangers Elsewhere is a 47-page sourcebook for Shoshana Kessock’s beginner-friendly larp Dangers Untold. This sourcebook, which I co-wrote with Avonelle Wing and Ruth Tillman, contains several diverse alternate campaign settings. Each setting contains at least seven pre-generated characters.

Given that this sourcebook is essentially a list of alternate settings, you could easily use it for Heroine or any other feminist YA fantasy game.

I will send a link to this rare sourcebook to every new Versed patron in the month of January. All you have to do is back the podcast at any level. I suggest the $1 per month level.

Publications

My poetry has been published by Dark Gothic Resurrected, Thomas Novosel Press, and elsewhere.

Here are two short poems I wrote in 2016.

“Most Beautiful Words”

Word around the pediatric unit
Is that my precious son
Goes home today.
Five of the most beautiful
Words I know:
My son
Goes home
Today.

 

“Last Dinner for Two”
The moon on the water, the stars in the sky,
How they shined while we dined by the shore.
The pine needles dance in the wind. You and I
Never dance in the wind anymore.
Oh my dove, how our love’s shadow grows.
Oh my dove, why’d I wait?
Oh my dove, I say, Hope. You say, No.
Oh my dove, it’s too late.
Now sky falls upon us, the earth turns to ash
And the air cooks our lungs with each breath.
The pine needles bake, and the lake turns to glass,
But I dance by the shore till my death.
Oh my dove, how our love’s shadow grows.
Oh my dove, why’d I wait?
Oh my dove, I say, Hope. You say, No.
Oh my dove, it’s too late.
[The speaker’s voice is temporarily drowned out by fire noises.]
Oh my dove, how our love’s shadow grows.
Oh my dove, why’d I wait?
Oh my dove, I say, Hope. You say, No.
Oh my dove, it’s too late.

Episode 1 Dorothy Parker

As a dad, poet, and English teacher, I love poetry and I want to help introduce you to some of the amazing poems you’ve never heard before. I understand that people can find poetry intimidating or strange, so during each episode, I read a poem and talk about why I like it for a minute or two. That’s it. No pressure. I’m making Versed to make you feel more comfortable reading poetry and to introduce you to passionate, talented poets that I didn’t discover until after college.

If you like the show, you can support Versed on Patreon.

Animal Professionals of Place Place Number: A Solo Writing Game

I had a game idea for Ole Peder Giæver​’s #3nano16 game design challenge as I was falling asleep last night.

Animal Professionals of Place Place Number

APoPPN is a one player writing game that takes the form of writing a formal playtest feedback letter about a game that doesn’t exist.
1. Write a letter to a GM or game designer. Choose someone whose work inspires you and who knows you at least by name.
2. Thank them for the chance to playtest their latest game. Give it a name in the form of [Animal] [Professionals ] of [Place] [Place] [Number], eg “Squirrel Jugglers of Star Moon 5.”
3. Tell them about something that you liked about the game. Compare it to a game or movie that you love. If possible, describe an interaction between characters in your playthrough of the game. Name the characters after people you work with or go to school with. Last names only! Name the players after gamers you know.
4. Tell them what confused you about the game. Quote a rule from their game that doesn’t seem to fit. (Use a sentence from page 42 of the book closest to you as this rule quote. You can quote it exactly or use this real book as inspiration for your rules quote.)
5 Thank them again for the chance to playtest their game. Give them a genuine compliment about their (real) previous game designs or GMing.
6. Sign your letter with the name they know you by
7. Mail, email, or post your letter online where the intended recipient will see it.
8. (Optional) Include a link to the text of this game, so they don’t think you’re completely bonkers.
This game is copyright Josh Jordan and is released under Creative Commons Attribution. You may repost these rules wherever you like.

The Five Seals of InfoSec

Here’s a weird idea that I don’t have time to turn into a game. Feel free to hack it, if you like.
Information Security, or InfoSec, is too important to be entrusted to normal people. That’s why NATO and Warsaw Pact nations began to train mages to protect our nations’ secrets.
There are now several overlapping schools of InfoSec datamancy throughout the world. The most successful are in the US, Germany, China, Russia, and India. Rumors persist of schools in Brazil and Israel, but if the other governments are aware of schools in those countries, they aren’t talking.
How does InfoSec magic work? There are various incantations and techniques for protecting government secrets. However, the five most common techniques are called the Seals of InfoSec. Each seal represents an entire branch of datamancy. Not all schools teach all five seals. Some schools are much better at one or two of the seals than the rest. But all datamancers are at least aware of the five seals. There are spells and curses outside of the five seals, but these rogue spells are the exception rather than the rule.

The Five Seals

Seal of Obscurity

Seal of Tedium

Seal of Banality

Seal of Encryption

Seal of Monitoring

Obscurity spells make information hard to see or hard to find. This is the most common seal. All schools teach some obscurity spells.
Tedium spells make the information time consuming to read or understand. Imagine an entire book with the words “Fat,” Tuesday,” and “Bingo” placed randomly between the actual words of the text. This would not make the actual words hard to find, but it would make them take more time to read.
Banality spells make the information so boring or mundane in appearance that it is difficult for an untrained person to focus on the information long enough to finish consuming it. (Banality spells were originally created in the US as an answer the Russian creation of Tedium spells. Now, most InfoSec schools teach both techniques, sometimes in combination.)
Encryption spells alter the information so that it looks like random noise unless you have the code to unlock it. The observer can see the information, but can’t make heads or tails of it without the proper training. This is the only school of datamancy that actually involves computers as spell components. Other seals may allow you to cast spells on information INSIDE a computer, but encryption spells are often cast BY MEANS OF a computer.
Monitoring spells do not conceal the information, but they allow the caster to observe anyone who attempts to interact with the information. This defense is less like a barbed wire fence and more like a security camera. Specialists in monitoring spells often carry guns and stay hidden in a room near the information they are protecting.

How does datamancy work? What does this magic look like? I can’t tell you. What’s the difference between magic and technology? Unfortunately, that’s a secret, too. The best I can say is that this sort of magic should either strike your players as cool or you shouldn’t use it in your game. And if you want to see the guy who inspired me to write even this much on the subject, I recommend Sam Chupp’s Encryptopedia.

Image by Blondinrikard Fröberg. Used by permission.